Our Wood-fired Pizzas and prices

Every Friday evening at Husk we will be serving up a selection of our lovely 12″, thin and crispy Wood-fired Pizzas.

We’re open from 5.30pm to 8.30pm. Please ring with your order and then you are welcome to wait while they are prepared and cooked in our wood-fired oven, which is definitely an art rather than a science, or pop up to The Earle Arms for a swift glass of something. It is Friday after all.

Margherita 2 cheeses, tomato sauce – £6.50

Mushroom 2 cheeses, tomato sauce, onion, pepper, shiitake, porcini, granulatus – £7.00

Mozzarella with fresh basil – £7.50

Pepperoni, Salami 2 cheeses, tomato sauce, onion, pepper – £7.50

Gorgonzola & Prosciutto with fresh peppery rocket – £8.50

Extras: Choose from Black Olives, Anchovies, Jalapenos, Sundried Tomatoes, Chilli Flakes, Capers and Mushroom. – 70p each

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Behind the scenes

A few pics to show you what Husk looks like if you’ve never visited.

Tools of the trade.

Tools of the trade.

The all important order book.

The all important order book.

Prep zone.

Prep zone.

Where some of our bread ends up.

Where some of our bread ends up.

How could you resist...

How could you resist…

Saucy.

Saucy.

Woodfired Pizza Night. Every Friday!

Woodfired Pizza Night. Every Friday!

The coal face

The coal face

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Woodfired Pizzas are back on the Friday night menu

Husk wood-fired-pizzaEvery Friday I will be stoking up the fire at Husk and with the help of my wife, Linda, Ruby and Theo. We will be serving the county and beyond with our gorgeous Woodfired Pizzas.

We are open from 5.30pm to 8.30pm. Best to ring with your order and then you are welcome to wait while they cook, which is definitely and art rather than a science. Alternatively pop up to The Earle Arms and enjoy a crafty pint before returning home the hero with your order. (Warning: The Earle Arms does tend to close in January).

View from the bakery

View from the bakery

Our Woodfired Pizzas are 12″, thin and crispy and you can have either a tomato or garlicy oil sauce, then choose your toppings from the following. We have plenty of extras for you to customise your order, just ask.

Marguerita 2 cheeses, tomato sauce

Pepperoni, Salami 2 cheeses, tomato sauce, onion, pepper

Mushroom 2 cheeses, tomato sauce, onion, pepper, shiitake, porcini, granulatus

Extras choose from Black Olives, Anchovies, Jalapenos, Sundried Tomatoes, Chilli Flakes, Capers and Mushroom.

We welcome any comments and indeed any ideas for alternative toppings. just let one of the Husk team know and we will see what we can do!

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M&S gets the knives out for ‘simple white bread’ – The Guardian

Amid other sad news on Monday came the announcement that sliced white is toast. Well, it is at M&S anyway, with the retailer announcing plans to scrap “simple white bread” in favour of a fibre-enriched alternative – what product developer Jenny Galletly calls “bread with benefits”.

I’m tempted to object to this idea on principle, given that the main benefit of all bread, whatever the fibre content, is that it’s completely, addictively delicious, but though sliced white has a certain nostalgic pull for me, I can’t regret its passing.

One whiff of that yeasty, faintly vinegary smell and I’m back in school uniform again, rushing to cram as many slices of toast in as possible during morning break in the hope of inducing a pleasurable carb coma just in time for double maths. These days, however, with algebraic equations a distant trauma, I find its cotton-wool texture faintly sinister, and the way it gums to the top of the mouth downright unpleasant. I’m not alone; sales of sliced white are in what one research company describes as “terminal decline” as consumers reach for fancier, “speciality” alternatives, so M&S might well be on to something.

Yet the bog-standard loaf has some surprising adult fans; Nigel Slater, for one, who insists that a bacon sandwich “must be on white sliced bread of the very worst sort”, while Nigella uses it for her delectable mozzarella in carrozza toastie, writing that “one of the advantages of plastic bread is that it is easily wodged together”.

Masterchef judge Gregg Wallace is a fierce defender of the stuff – according to his autobiography (rarely off my bedside table), a fish-finger sandwich made with Mother’s Pride is his idea of “absolute perfection”. Fair enough. He has also, however, claimed to the Daily Mail, “there is no nutritional difference between a £10 artisan baked loaf and an 80p sliced white. The only difference is snobbery.”

Which is where I draw the line; anyone’s free to enjoy whatever bread they wish, but please, don’t claim that the cheapest sort, pumped full of yeast, palm oil, enzymes and preservatives to speed the baking process and retard the ageing one, are on a par with traditionally made versions. It’s just not true (plus, I’ve never come across a £10 loaf Gregg, and I live in Islington).

If we ate only for nutrition, we should probably stick to the kind of dark, brooding sourdough studded with so many seeds it should be sold with a box of toothpicks, but we don’t. White bread has a taste, and a texture all of its own, and some things, crisp butties and bacon sarnies among them, just wouldn’t be the same without it.

In an ideal world, it would just be made with flour, yeast, water and salt, but adding a bit of extra fibre is a good start. Let’s hope that, as in the case of the ready meal, and the gourmet sandwich, where M&S lead, others follow.

Feature in full here: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2016/jan/11/marks-and-spencer-scrapping-simple-white-bread

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Christmas & New Year Opening Times 2015

IMG_1557

First of all thank you all my lovely customers for your continued support through 2015.

The Bakery will be closed on Thursday 24th December and we will be stoking up the fire and re-open on Wednesday 6th January. Please let me know of any orders you may have in plenty of time.

The last Woodfired Pizza Night will be Friday 18th December and we will be up and running again on Friday 8th January.

Best wishes to one and all. Have a great Christmas and New Year.

All the best, Paul and Linda.

IMG_1559

 

 

 

 

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Husk on holiday – August 2015

husk-1_4879.jpg

Dear all, thank you for all your continued support.

Just to let you all know I am going to take a short break to re-charge my batteries.

Husk Bakery will be closed from Monday 17th August and open again Friday 28th evening just for Pizzas and Saturday 29th for bread.

Thank you, Paul.

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The Great British Bake Off

 

Everything you need to know about the new series.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b013pqnm

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Firing up for Friday Pizza Night

For any of you out there who have not tried my Woodfired Pizzas, here’s a little bit more info.

Every Friday I will be stoking up the fire at Husk and with the help of my wife, Linda, Alice and Theo. We will be serving the county and beyond with gorgeous Woodfired Pizzas.

We are open from 5.30pm to 8.30pm. Best to ring with your order and then you are welcome to wait while they cook, which is definitely and art rather than a science. Alternatively pop up to The Earle Arms and enjoy a crafty pint before returning home the hero with your order.

Pizzas are 12″, thin and crispy and you can have either a tomato or garlicy oil sauce, then choose your toppings from the following. We have plenty of extras for you to customise your order, just ask.

Marguerita 2 cheeses, tomato sauce

Pepperoni, Salami 2 cheeses, tomato sauce, onion, pepper

Mushroom 2 cheeses, tomato sauce, onion, pepper, shiitake, porcini, granulatus

Extras choose from Black Olives, Anchovies, Jalapenos, Sundried Tomatoes, Chilli Flakes, Capers and Mushroom.

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Bread Matters

http://breadmatters.com/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=15

 

Real Bread Campaign

http://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/

 

River Cottage – Cookery Courses

http://www.rivercottage.net/baking-courses/advanced-bread-making/

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Dispute over bread leaves a sour taste

Ok, this may be from an Australian Good Food website but very interesting reading.

If you would like to know how HUSK make their Sourdough, just ask Paul, he’ll explain it all and with a passion because that’s what he has for all the bread he produces.

 

By Sarah Whyte and John Elder. http://www.goodfood.com.au

Consumers are being misled by Woolworths, Coles and bakeries that label their bread as ”sourdough” despite it being little more than sour-flavoured white bread, artisan bread makers say.

A traditional sourdough loaf should only contain only flour, salt and water, and the mixture left to ferment and rise for at least eight hours, as yeast naturally forms, resulting in a healthier bread.

Sandra Cucuzza of Fatto a Mano Organic Bakery in Fitzroy says the process is ”hugely labour intensive” while the mixture is carefully watched overnight, or even for two days, until it is ready to be baked.

But supermarkets and bakeries are cashing in on the artisan bread phenomenon, selling white bread that has been pre-mixed with citric acid and yeast as ”sourdough” for premium prices.

A ”traditional sourdough” loaf from Woolworths, that contains yeast and ”sourdough culture” costs $5.25, and a Coles Bakery ”baguette white sourdough” costs $4. Bakers across Australia are calling for the definition of sourdough to be regulated, as it is in France, saying it is unfair that major supermarkets and bakeries sell an inferior bread at the same price.

”They’re trying to stooge people,” says Ms Cucuzza.

A sourdough loaf at Fatto a Mano is $6.50, but Ms Cucuzza points out that her sourdough contains only unbleached flour and water that’s been fermented, and sea salt, and that the fermented base was actually started 11 years ago by the previous owners.

”The idea is you keep a piece of that original dough and mix it with fresh flour and ferment it overnight or for two days. Ours is 11 years old. The bakers that were here before us left their starter, and we’ve been here seven years.”

Ms Cucuzza sells about 140 loaves of sourdough a day. ”We have a lot of restaurants and cafes that use bread. It’s well loved. We have people that come from the country. They say they don’t want to eat the rubbish from the supermarket.”

A ban on inferior sourdough ”would clean a lot of things up”, said award-winning baker Brett Noy.

”A lot of artisan bakers hate that the major supermarkets and local bakeries are jumping in on that marketing bandwagon to achieve sales.”

This is not the first time labels and false claims have been used to entice customers. Fairfax Media found ”freshly cut flowers” in both Coles and Woolworths were imported from Kenya and Colombia; French-grown citrus fruits sit under an ”Australian grown” sign in Coles, and ”freshly baked bread” was coming from Ireland, Germany and Denmark.

When Holly Berry, of Bungendore, discovered her Woolworths sourdough loaf contained commercial yeast she wrote an email to complain. The company’s response was revealing.

”All sourdough contains yeast,” wrote a Woolworths spokeswoman in an email.

”It’s just the yeast in sourdough are wild and are of a different species than commercially available yeast. There are also no laws on what constitutes a sourdough. There is a very small percentage of commercial yeast that is added to get the consistency of size and shape required by the retail consumer.”

Artisan bakers disagree with the Woolworths definition of sourdough.

”Look at the ingredients,” Mr Noy said. ”If it has more than flour, salt and water, then it is not a true sourdough.”

Master baker at Sydney’s Bourke Street Bakery, Paul Giddings, who has been baking sourdough for 8½ years, said his sourdough took up to 17 hours to cook as the wheat fermented to create the culture that gave the sour taste.

”I can recognise when I go into a bakery who is making what I consider to be sourdough bread because I know the amount of work that has gone into it,” he said.

With demand for sourdough on the rise consumers need to know that not all sourdough is the same, said Tom Godfrey, spokesman for consumer watchdog Choice. ”Before considering paying a premium for sourdough, ask the baker if the recipe is authentic and doesn’t contain powdered yeast,” he said.

Coles spokeswoman Anna Kelly said the supermarket’s sourdough was prepared ”using a traditional sourdough recipe used by bakers everywhere”.

Woolworths spokeswoman Siobhan Quinn did not respond in time to Fairfax Media’s queries.

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